Publications.

Transform consistently produces influential drug policy research and analysis that explores legal regulation responsibly and with compassion. From short briefing papers to substantial books, our work is available to download for free in PDF form. Our books are also available to purchase in our shop.

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  • We reveal how the prohibition of drugs is the root cause of almost all drug-related acquisitive crime, and that this crime constitutes the majority of drug-related harms and costs to society.
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  • Transform’s flagship guide to regulating drugs, 'After the War on Drugs: Blueprint for Regulation' sets out, for the first time, what a legally regulated system of drug control could look like in practice.

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    Executive Summary
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  • This briefing challenges the myths about the Dutch system by setting out the facts on the key issues.

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  • As jurisdictions enact reforms creating legal access to cannabis for purposes other than exclusively “medical and scientific,” tensions surrounding the existing UN drug treaties and evolving law and practice in Member States continue to grow. How might governments and the UN system address these growing tensions in ways that acknowledge the policy shifts underway and help to modernize the drug treaty regime itself, and thereby reinforce the UN pillars of human rights, development, peace and security, and the rule of law?
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  • Colorado’s regulatory framework has defied the critics, and its impacts have been largely positive.

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  • Cannabis social clubs are not profit motivated and therefore offer a more cautious, public health-centred alternative to large-scale retail cannabis markets dominated by commercial enterprises.

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  • The most direct cause of environmental destruction caused by the war on drugs is crop eradication. This threatens biodiversity, fuels deforestation, and drives illicit crop growers to pursue environmentally hazardous methods of drug production.

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  • Children and young people killed or injured in drug-market violence, criminal convictions or deaths from contaminated street drugs are all the direct result of the drug war.

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  • Criminalisation has proven not only to be ineffective, but also socially corrosive. It promotes stigmatisation and discrimination, largely towards already marginalised or vulnerable populations.

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  • The war on drugs has filed to control or eliminate drug use, and has increased the potential risk and harms associated with drug taking.

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  • The war on drugs places the burden most heavily on the marginalised and vulnerable, who are the primary targets of development efforts. This includes the poor, children and young people, women, minority and indigenous populations, and people who use drugs.

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  • Across the world the war on drugs is severely undermining human rights, often criminalising the most vulnerable in society.

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  • The war on drugs is undermining development and security, and fuelling conflict in many poor and fragile countries.

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  • By handing the drug market to adaptable and ruthless criminal entrepreneurs they are free to fight for control of the drug market through violence and corruption. They possess the resources top undermine governance and promote conflict.

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  • The war on drugs has fuelled the development of the world largest illegal commodities market, with an additional cost of at least $100 billion a year for enforcement.

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  • This concise guide will give you the knowledge and confidence to make the case of the legal regulation of drugs.

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  • The UK’s approach to drugs has lead to record levels of drug-related deaths, criminalises and stigmatises millions, while sweeping many young people into a current of criminality they can’t escape. Decriminalising drugs can reduce or eliminate these problems.

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  • Drug Consumption Rooms (DCRs) significantly reduce: fatal overdoses and needle sharing that can lead to infections, including HIV and hepatitis; high risk public injecting; and discarded needles, while increasing numbers entering treatment.

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  • Portugal decriminalised the possession of all drugs for personal use in 2001, and what happened next was extraordinary.

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  • The central aim of Swedish drug policy is to create a drug-free society. To achieve this aim, the country has adopted a punitive, enforcement-led approach to drugs, but there are other factors at play

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  • Knowing what is in any drug, and how strong it is, can reduce the risk of overdose, poisoning or long term damage. But how does drug safety testing work?

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  • This is a guide to making the case for drug policy and law reform from a position of confidence and authority, with a particular focus on the issue of legal regulation of currently illegal drug markets – an issue that is now core to the drugs debate. It is for every policymaker, media commentator, and campaigner who not only recognises that the ‘war on drugs’ is a counterproductive failure that is creating catastrophic unintended consequences, but who also wants to convince others to back reform. It will equip you with the constructive arguments, different approaches and nuanced messaging needed to address the concerns and interests of diverse audiences. This will enable you to not just win the argument, but make the new allies needed to turn the current unparalleled momentum for reform into concrete policy change nationally and internationally.
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  • Prescribing heroin for some dependent users is called heroin assisted treatment (HAT). The practice is well established, already legal under UK (and international) law, and has a long history with many benefits to public health.

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  • A number of countries – including Switzerland, the UK, Germany, the Netherlands and Canada – prescribe heroin for use under medical supervision, as part of successful programmes to treat long-term users of illicit opioids.

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  • Transform’s guide to regulating legal markets for the recreational use of cannabis. It is for policy makers, drug policy reform advocates and affected communities all over the world, who are witnessing the question change from, ‘Should we maintain cannabis prohibition?’ to ‘How will legal regulation work in practice?’

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    Executive Summary
  • The Scottish Government has a unique opportunity to deliver innovative drug policy that would transform Scotland from the drug-death capital of Europe, to a beacon of compassionate, effective approaches.

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  • The second edition of the Alternative World Drug Report details the damage caused by the drug war. It demonstrates that the current approach is creating crime, harming health, and fatally undermining all “three pillars” of the UN’s work – peace and security, development, and human rights.

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  • Turkey’s move from illicit to licit opium production for medicinal use demonstrates that an orderly transition, with a range of benefits is possible.

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  • This report argues that decriminalisation of personal drug possession or the introduction of legally regulated drug markets can produce better outcomes while also avoiding dramatic increases in use.

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